The poster presented April 20, 2017.

The poster presented April 20, 2017.

Flyer for the Pensacola-based band Maggot Sandwich. Ca. 1985.

Flyer for the Pensacola-based band Maggot Sandwich. Ca. 1985.

2017

The end of my graduate career brought a poster presentation and the first public showing of a documentary. The graduate poster presentation was the culmination of my research and work on History's role in documentary film making. This poster summarized my approach to two documentary projects: Frida Kahlo: A Documentary and Pensacola Punks.

Frida Kahlo is a short film showing the connections to the famed artist and Mexico's national identity, communism, and twentieth-century feminism. The film is a companion piece to a fifteen-page paper. The idea is to use short documentaries as a trailer for the more comprehensive research done by historians. More information can be found here

Pensacola Punks is an ongoing film project that incorporates public history methodologies to the documentary medium. The punk, or alternative, scene is an under-documented subculture in any city, but especially in smaller cities and towns, like Pensacola, FL. The result was a 26-minute film and a permanent archive collection at Voices of Pensacola. It was a new approach to historical documentaries and is available for anyone to contribute to the project. More information can be found here

RRR Palafox.png
Radar of the hurricane that started it all. 

Radar of the hurricane that started it all. 

Detail 2

A 2015 undergraduate oral presentation in which I presented a research paper entitled, Rebirth, Renew, Reimagine or: What does the Palafox Street Say? 

This research compared the time before and after the devastating Hurricane Ivan September 2004. My focus was the immediate downtown area (Garden St to Main St, Tarragona St to Baylen St) of Pensacola, FL and what measures the city, citizens, and businesses took to revitalize the city after a catastrophic disaster. Abstractly, the paper explores how a major event is an historical marker, but that it is not the end of the story. 

Broken into three sections, Rebirth explored how a disastrous natural disaster literally cleared the way with up to 10-foot storm surge and winds up to 120 mph for Pensacola, FL to build the downtown area anew. Renew calculated the influence of the new influx of insurance money into the economy. This money went to build/redesign businesses, start planning what will later become the Community Maritime Park & Blue Wahoos Stadium, and to move the water treatment plant from half a mile from the coast to a site further inland. Re-imagine took the path of Pensacola's revitalization and examined how the city was able to attract new tourism, businesses, and culture.

The paper was originally for the Urban History course at the University of West Florida.